If you were monitoring that renowned bastion of reasonable and level-headed debate known as Twitter during the Canadian Grand Prix, you’d be forgiven for thinking that Formula One had folded overnight, never to be seen again among the ranks of top-tier motorsport.

Qualifying is one of the most universally popular parts of a grand prix weekend, so it’s surprising that the competitive Saturday session is regularly considered for change as the sport strives for self-improvement.

What is the perfect form of Formula One? There are no easy answers, but the sport’s authorities hope the plan they’ll present to teams today will be convincing enough to settle the long-running battle for the championship’s soul.

Closer and faster for longer: that’s the aim of a series of small regulatory changes designed to have a substantial effect on the quality of racing in Formula One this season.

Formula One teams get just eight precious days to test their 2019 machinery ahead of next month’s season-opening Australian Grand Prix. At the halfway mark, we can begin to draw some broad-brush conclusions.

Lewis Hamilton and Sebastian Vettel at the 2018 Abu Dhabi Grand Prix.

The 2019 preseason starts today.

Too much practice and too much simulation has left F1 teams almost bulletproof on race day.

If F1 teams can’t perfect their cars, racing becomes less predictable.

Valtteri Bottas and Lewis Hamilton in formation at the 2018 Russian Grand Prix.

The power unit framework, not the qualifying structure itself, is to blame for the sport’s latest Saturday malaise.

A concept 2021 F1 car.

F1’s 2021 car concept looks great, but the chances of it becoming a reality are slim.