Honda’s departure from top-level motorsport has left Red Bull Racing in need of an engine and Formula One in an existential crisis.

Max Verstappen dominated a chaotic Brazilian Grand Prix to lead an unlikely Honda one-two ahead of Toro Rosso’s Pierre Gasly.

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The team may well win races with Honda this year, just as it probably would’ve done with Renault, but it won’t be until 2020 and beyond that the true success of the relationship can be judged. Best the team doesn’t get ahead of itself before then.
Formula One teams get just eight precious days to test their 2019 machinery ahead of next month’s season-opening Australian Grand Prix. At the halfway mark, we can begin to draw some broad-brush conclusions.
Formula One’s teams had turned their attention to 2019 long before the dust had settled on the 2018 season, and this week’s first preseason test will be a key indicator as to which of them have planned wisely for the year ahead.
Lewis Hamilton and Sebastian Vettel at the 2018 Abu Dhabi Grand Prix.
The 2019 preseason starts today.
Has Honda really turned a corner in its fight for F1 credibility?
Red Bull Racing and Honda's logos.
Red Bull Racing's Honda gamble is aimed at long-term success.
Toro Rosso's Brendon Hartley and Red Bull Racing's Daniel Ricciardo on track at the 2018 Monaco Grand Prix.
Red Bull Racing wants to choose Honda power for 2019 — but can Honda make it worth the team's while?
Honda F1 boss Toyoharu Tanabe. during 2018 winter testing.
There's a lot riding on Honda's Canada upgrades.
Valtteri Bottas testing in Barcelona
Has Mercedes got the title wrapped up already?
The Honda logo on the 2018 Toro Rosso car
Honda has proved surprisingly reliable partnered with Toro Rosso during preseason testing.
Honda's Masashi Yamamoto
Toro Rosso-Honda has proved surprisingly reliable compared to McLaren-Renault.
Maurizio Arrivabene (Ferrari) and Toto Wolff (Mercedes) in the Friday press conference at the 2017 Abu Dhabi Grand Prix.
The 2017 rules changes worked to shake up the field — sort of.
Red Bull Racing principal Christian Horner, McLaren executive director Zak Brown, and Renault Sport managing director Cyril Abiteboul at the 2017 Singapore Grand Prix.
Red Bull Racing's history with Renault suggests it probably isn't.
McLaren has binned its Honda partnership.
Timing was everything in Formula One's least surprising evening of announcements.
McLaren executive director Zak Brown.
McLaren's switch to Renault is riskier than it may first appear.
The McLaren MCL32 on the track.
McLaren is risking big for success by making a switch from Honda to Renault for 2018.