There is no other driver operating on the same level as Lewis Hamilton today. While the Briton has earned the benefit of a class-leading car and is obviously immensely naturally talented, it’s his insatiable desire to be the best — surely the point of any elite competition — that is setting him apart from his undoubtedly fast rivals.

‘Rage quit’ isn’t a phrase heard thrown around in Formula One.

If you were monitoring that renowned bastion of reasonable and level-headed debate known as Twitter during the Canadian Grand Prix, you’d be forgiven for thinking that Formula One had folded overnight, never to be seen again among the ranks of top-tier motorsport.

You might think just six rounds into a 21-race season is too early for the driver merry-go-round to start turning, but speculation is never far from hand in Formula One.

It might be unusual to say any driver other than Lewis Hamilton, with four wins from six and a 17-point championship lead, is the standout performer of the season to date, but Max Verstappen has never been ordinary.

The battle of wills is what Monte Carlos is all about, and that’s what makes Monaco magic.

One year on from his lights-to-flag domination of the Monaco Grand Prix and Daniel Ricciardo has no hope of even a podium on the hallowed Monte Carlo streets.

Formula One has lost one of its favourite sons and an all-time great

There is no class B F1 championship, but with the divide between the three front-running teams and the rest growing ever wider, the midfield is long overdue for some recognition.

Five races into the 21-race season and, with the exception of the outright championship favourite, the Formula One pecking order has only partially revealed itself.