Pierre Gasly in his garage at the 2019 Hungarian Grand Prix.

In Formula One, as in all professions, you know you’re in trouble when even your colleagues start making fun of you.

The result may have done little to change the championship picture, but in Germany Formula One had the opportunity to celebrate those who have been cast into the shadows by the Mercedes juggernaut.

Just as Silverstone is the only real destination for the British Grand Prix, so too is Melbourne the only viable home for Formula One in Australia.

It would be hyperbole to say Vettel’s past it, but at Silverstone it was hard not to wonder whether his rivals have passed him.

Every driver market story carries with it a kernel of truth, and it’ll be fascinating to see how the 2019–20 silly season comes together.

It mightn’t be perfect, but the Austrian Grand Prix demonstrated that Formula can yet be saved.

There is no other driver operating on the same level as Lewis Hamilton today. While the Briton has earned the benefit of a class-leading car and is obviously immensely naturally talented, it’s his insatiable desire to be the best — surely the point of any elite competition — that is setting him apart from his undoubtedly fast rivals.

‘Rage quit’ isn’t a phrase heard thrown around in Formula One.

If you were monitoring that renowned bastion of reasonable and level-headed debate known as Twitter during the Canadian Grand Prix, you’d be forgiven for thinking that Formula One had folded overnight, never to be seen again among the ranks of top-tier motorsport.

You might think just six rounds into a 21-race season is too early for the driver merry-go-round to start turning, but speculation is never far from hand in Formula One.